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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 20:30:04    Tittel: Re: Guerrillas Svar med Sitat

"James Hogg" <Jas.HoggOUT@SPAM.gmail.com> wrote in message

Little Popeet: The Lost Child
Near by the silent waters of the Mediterranean,
And at the door of an old hut stood a coloured man,
Whose dress was oriental in style and poor with wear,
While adown his furrowed cheeks ran many a tear.

And the poor coloured man seemed very discontent,
And his grief overcame him at this moment;
And he wrung his hands in agony wild,
And he cried, "Oh! help me, great God, to find my child."

"And Ada, my dear wife, but now she is dead,
Which fills my poor heart with sorrow and dread;
She was a very loving wife, but of her I'm bereft,
And I and my lost child are only left.

And, alas! I know not where to find my boy,
Who is dear to me and my only joy;
But with the help of God I will find him,
And this day in search of him I will begin."

So Medoo leaves Turkey and goes to France,
Expecting to find his boy there perhaps by chance;
And while there in Paris he was told
His boy by an Arab had been sold

To a company of French players that performed in the street,
Which was sad news to hear about his boy Popeet;
And while searching for him and making great moan,
He was told he was ill and in Madame Mercy's Home.

Then away went Medoo with his heart full of joy,
To gaze upon the face of his long-lost boy;
Who had been treated by the players mercilessly,
But was taken to the home of Madame Celeste.

She was a member of the players and the leader's wife,
And she loved the boy Popeet as dear as her life,
Because she had no children of her own;
And for the poor ill-treated boy often she did moan.

And when Popeet's father visited the Home,
He was shown into a room where Popeet lay alone,
Pale and emaciated, in his little bed;
And when his father saw him he thought he was dead.

And when Popeet saw his father he lept out of bed,
And only that his father caught him he'd been killed dead;
And his father cried, " Popeet, my own darling boy,
Thank God I've found you, and my heart's full of joy."

Then Madame Mercy's tears fell thick and fast,
When she saw that Popeet had found his father at last;
Then poor Popeet was taken home without delay,
And lived happy with his father for many a day.
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 20:32:08    Tittel: Re: Guerrillas Svar med Sitat

"Jack Linthicum" <jacklinthicum@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:eee3934f-6c95-4f46-a06a-83200fdfedd0@h25g2000hsf.googlegroups.com ...
Sitat:
On Feb 24, 1:18 pm, "Nebulous" <jw...@pigtail.com> wrote:
"D. Spencer Hines" <pant...@excelsior.com> wrote in message
news:gpiwj.744

Some Scottish culture, courtesy of spencer Hines.

The Destroying Angel
or The Poet's Dream
I dreamt a dream the other night
That an Angel appeared to me, clothed in white.
Oh! it was a beautiful sight,
Such as filled my heart with delight.

And in her hand she held a flaming brand,
Which she waved above her head most grand;
And on me she glared with love-beaming eyes,
Then she commanded me from my bed to arise.

And in a sweet voice she said, "You must follow me,
And in a short time you shall see
The destruction of all the public-houses in the city,
Which is, my friend, the God of Heaven's decree."

Then from my bed in fear I arose,
And quickly donned on my clothes;
And when that was done she said, " Follow me
Direct to the High Street, fearlessly."

So with the beautiful Angel away I did go,
And when we arrived at the High Street, Oh! what a show,
I suppose there were about five thousand men there,
All vowing vengeance against the publicans, I do declare.

Then the Angel cried with a solemn voice aloud
To that vast and Godly assembled crowd,
"Gentlemen belonging the fair City of Dundee,
Remember I have been sent here by God to warn ye.

"That by God's decree ye must take up arms and follow me
And wreck all the public-houses in this fair City,
Because God cannot countenance such dens of iniquity.
Therefore, friends of God, come, follow me.

"Because God has said there's no use preaching against strong drink,
Therefore, by taking up arms against it, God does think,
That is the only and the effectual cure
To banish it from the land, He is quite sure.

"Besides, it has been denounced in Dundee for fifty years
By the friends of Temperance, while oft they have shed tears.
Therefore, God thinks there's no use denouncing it any longer,
Because the more that's said against it seemingly it grows stronger."

And while the Angel was thus addressing the people,
The Devil seemed to be standing on the Townhouse Steeple,
Foaming at the mouth with rage, and seemingly much annoyed,
And kicking the Steeple because the public-houses wore going to be
destroyed.

Then the Angel cried, " Satan, avaunt! begone!"
Then he vanished in the flame, to the amazement of everyone;
And waving aloft the flaming brand,
That she carried in her right hand

She cried, "Now, friends of the Temperance cause, follow me:
For remember if's God's high decree
To destroy all the public-houses in this fair City;
Therefore, friends of God, let's commence this war immediately."

Then from the High Street we all did retire,
As the Angel, sent by God, did desire;
And along the Perth Road we all did go,
While the Angel set fire to the public-houses along that row.

And when the Perth Road public-houses were fired, she cried, " Follow me,
And next I'll fire the Hawkhill public-houses instantly."
Then away we went with the Angel, without dread or woe,
And she fired the Hawkhill public-houses as onward we did go.

Then she cried, "Let's on to the Scouringburn, in God's name."
And away to the Scouringburn we went, with our hearts aflame,
As the destroying Angel did command.
And when there she fired the public-houses, which looked very grand.

And when the public-houses there were blazing like a kiln,
She cried, " Now, my friends, we'll march to the Bonnet Hill,
And we'll fire the dens of iniquity without dismay,
Therefore let's march on, my friends, without delay."

And when we arrived at the Bonnet Hill,
The Angel fired the public-houses, as she did well.
Then she cried, "We'll leave them now to their fate,
And march on to the Murraygate."

Then we marched on to the Murraygate,
And the Angel fired the public-houses there, a most deserving fate.
Then to the High Street we marched and fired them there,
Which was a most beautiful blaze, I do declare.

And on the High Street, old men and women were gathered there,
And as the flames ascended upwards, in amazement they did stare
When they saw the public-houses in a blaze,
But they clapped their hands with joy and to God gave praise.

Then the Angel cried, "Thank God, Christ's Kingdom's near at hand,
And there will soon be peace and plenty throughout the land,
And the ravages of the demon Drink no more will be seen."
But, alas, I started up in bed, and behold it was a dream!


The nebulizer of s.c.s. is back to his guerrilla tactics against various
Usenet groups again, eh?

Well, here is a poem I found and which I dedicate to Nebulous, the Freedom
Fighter of
soc.culture.scottish!:

Draw the Sword, Scotland!

G. R. Planche

Draw the sword, Scotland, Scotland, Scotland!
Over moor and mountain hath passed the war-sign;
The pibroch is pealing, pealing, pealing;
Who heeds not the summons is nae son o' thine.
The clans they are gathering, gathering, gathering,
The clans they are gathering by loch and by sea.
The banners they are flying, flying, flying,
The banners they are flying to lead to victory.
Draw the sword, Scotland, Scotland, Scotland!
Charge as you've charged in the days o' lang-syne;
Sound to the onset, the onset, the onset,
He who but falters is nae son o' thine.

Sheathe the sword, Scotland, Scotland, Scotland!
Sheathe the sword, Scotland, for dimm'd is its shine.
The foemen are fleeing, fleeing, fleeing,
And who kens nae mercy is nae son o' thine!
The struggle is over, over, over,
The struggle is over! - the victory won!
There are tears for the fallen, the fallen, the fallen,
And glory for all who their duty have done!
Sheathe the sword, Scotland, Scotland, Scotland!
With thy loved thistle new laurels entwine;
Time shall ne'er part them, part them, part them,
But hand down the garland to each son o' thine.


- nilita
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 20:51:47    Tittel: Re: Guerrillas Svar med Sitat

"La N" <nilita2004NOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:YCjwj.38638

Jenny Carrister, The Heroine of Lucknow-Mine
A HEROIC story I will unfold,
Concerning Jenny Carrister, a heroine bold,
Who lived in Australia, at a gold mine called Lucknow,
And Jenny was beloved by the the miners, somehow.

Jenny was the only daughter of the old lady who owned the mine-
And Jenny would come of an evening, like a gleam of sunshine,
And by the presence of her bright face and cheery voice,
She made the hearts of the unlucky diggers rejoice.

There was no pride about her, and day after day,
She walked with her young brother, who was always gay,
A beautiful boy he was, about thirteen years old,
And Jenny and her brother by the miners were greatly extolled.

Old Mrs Carrister was every inch a lady in her way,
Because she never pressed any of the miners that weren't able to pay
For the liberty of working the gold-field,
Which was thirty pounds per week for whatever it might yield.

It was in the early part of the year 1871,
That Jack Allingford, a miner, hit on a plan,
That in the mine, with powder, he'd loosen the granite-bound face,
So he selected, as he thought, a most suitable place.

And when all his arrangements had been made,
He was lowered down by a miner that felt a little afraid,
But most fortunately Jenny Carrister came up at the time,
Just as Jack Allingford was lowered into the mine.

Then she asked the man at the windlass if he'd had any luck,
But he picked up a piece of candle and then a match he struck;
Then Jenny asked the miner, What is that for?
And he replied to blast the mine, which I fear and abhor.

Then with a piece of rope he lowered the candle and matches into the mine,
While brave Jenny watched the action all the time;
And as the man continued to turn round the windlass handle,
Jenny asked him, Isn't it dangerous to lower the matches and candle?

Then the man replied, I hope there's no danger, Jenny, my lass,
But whatsoever God has ordained will come to pass;
And just as he said so the windlass handle swung round,
And struck him on the forehead, and he fell to the ground.

And when Jenny saw the blood streaming from the fallen man's head,
She rushed to the mouth of the shaft without any dread,
And Jenny called loudly, but received no reply,
So to her brother standing near by she heaved a deep sigh.

Telling him to run for assistance, while she swung herself on to the
hand-rope,
Resolved to save Jack Allingford's life as she earnestly did hope;
And as she proceeded down the shaft at a quick pace,
The brave heroine knew that death was staring her in the face.

And the rope was burning her hands as she descended,
But she thought if she saved Jack her task would be ended;
And when she reached the bottom of the mine she did not hesitate,
But bounding towards Jack Allingford, who was lying seemingly inanimate.

And as she approached his body the hissing fuse burst upon her ears,
But still the noble girl no danger fears;
While the hissing of the fuse was like an engine grinding upon her brain,
Still she resolved to save Jack while life in her body did remain.

She noticed a small jet of smoke issuing from a hole near his head,
And if he'd lain a few seconds longer there he'd been killed dead,
But God had sent an angel to his rescue,
For seizing him by the arms his body to the air shaft she drew.

It was a supernatural effort, but she succeeded at last,
And Jenny thanked God when the danger was past,
But at the same instant the silence was broke
By a loud explosion, which soon filled the mine with smoke.

But, oh, God be thanked! the greatest danger was past,
But when Jenny saw Jack Allingford, she stood aghast,
Because the blood was issuing from his nest and ears,
And as Jenny viewed his wounds she shed many tears.

But heroic Jenny was not one of the fainting sort,
For immediately to the mouth of the mine she did resort,
And she called loudly for help, the noble lass,
And her cry was answered by voices above at the windlass.

So there were plenty to volunteer their services below,
And the rope was attached to the windlass, and down they did go,
And Jack Allingford and Jenny were raised to the top,
While Jenny, noble soul, with exhaustion was like to drop.

And when the miners saw her safe above there was a burst of applause,
Because she had rescued Jack Allingford from death's jaws;
So all ye that read or hear this story, I have but to say,
That Jenny Carrister was the noblest heroine I've ever heard of in my day.
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 20:56:12    Tittel: Re: Darwin Award Writ Large -- Best Ensemble Performance Svar med Sitat

"D. Spencer Hines" <panther@excelsior.com> wrote in message news:2Qjwj.746

Some Scottish culture, courtesy of Spencer Hines
Jenny Carrister, The Heroine of Lucknow-Mine
A HEROIC story I will unfold,
Concerning Jenny Carrister, a heroine bold,
Who lived in Australia, at a gold mine called Lucknow,
And Jenny was beloved by the the miners, somehow.

Jenny was the only daughter of the old lady who owned the mine-
And Jenny would come of an evening, like a gleam of sunshine,
And by the presence of her bright face and cheery voice,
She made the hearts of the unlucky diggers rejoice.

There was no pride about her, and day after day,
She walked with her young brother, who was always gay,
A beautiful boy he was, about thirteen years old,
And Jenny and her brother by the miners were greatly extolled.

Old Mrs Carrister was every inch a lady in her way,
Because she never pressed any of the miners that weren't able to pay
For the liberty of working the gold-field,
Which was thirty pounds per week for whatever it might yield.

It was in the early part of the year 1871,
That Jack Allingford, a miner, hit on a plan,
That in the mine, with powder, he'd loosen the granite-bound face,
So he selected, as he thought, a most suitable place.

And when all his arrangements had been made,
He was lowered down by a miner that felt a little afraid,
But most fortunately Jenny Carrister came up at the time,
Just as Jack Allingford was lowered into the mine.

Then she asked the man at the windlass if he'd had any luck,
But he picked up a piece of candle and then a match he struck;
Then Jenny asked the miner, What is that for?
And he replied to blast the mine, which I fear and abhor.

Then with a piece of rope he lowered the candle and matches into the mine,
While brave Jenny watched the action all the time;
And as the man continued to turn round the windlass handle,
Jenny asked him, Isn't it dangerous to lower the matches and candle?

Then the man replied, I hope there's no danger, Jenny, my lass,
But whatsoever God has ordained will come to pass;
And just as he said so the windlass handle swung round,
And struck him on the forehead, and he fell to the ground.

And when Jenny saw the blood streaming from the fallen man's head,
She rushed to the mouth of the shaft without any dread,
And Jenny called loudly, but received no reply,
So to her brother standing near by she heaved a deep sigh.

Telling him to run for assistance, while she swung herself on to the
hand-rope,
Resolved to save Jack Allingford's life as she earnestly did hope;
And as she proceeded down the shaft at a quick pace,
The brave heroine knew that death was staring her in the face.

And the rope was burning her hands as she descended,
But she thought if she saved Jack her task would be ended;
And when she reached the bottom of the mine she did not hesitate,
But bounding towards Jack Allingford, who was lying seemingly inanimate.

And as she approached his body the hissing fuse burst upon her ears,
But still the noble girl no danger fears;
While the hissing of the fuse was like an engine grinding upon her brain,
Still she resolved to save Jack while life in her body did remain.

She noticed a small jet of smoke issuing from a hole near his head,
And if he'd lain a few seconds longer there he'd been killed dead,
But God had sent an angel to his rescue,
For seizing him by the arms his body to the air shaft she drew.

It was a supernatural effort, but she succeeded at last,
And Jenny thanked God when the danger was past,
But at the same instant the silence was broke
By a loud explosion, which soon filled the mine with smoke.

But, oh, God be thanked! the greatest danger was past,
But when Jenny saw Jack Allingford, she stood aghast,
Because the blood was issuing from his nest and ears,
And as Jenny viewed his wounds she shed many tears.

But heroic Jenny was not one of the fainting sort,
For immediately to the mouth of the mine she did resort,
And she called loudly for help, the noble lass,
And her cry was answered by voices above at the windlass.

So there were plenty to volunteer their services below,
And the rope was attached to the windlass, and down they did go,
And Jack Allingford and Jenny were raised to the top,
While Jenny, noble soul, with exhaustion was like to drop.

And when the miners saw her safe above there was a burst of applause,
Because she had rescued Jack Allingford from death's jaws;
So all ye that read or hear this story, I have but to say,
That Jenny Carrister was the noblest heroine I've ever heard of in my day.
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 21:17:31    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: Was: Don't Be Paroch Svar med Sitat

Ray O'Hara wrote:
Sitat:
"John Briggs" <john.briggs4@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:CJ2wj.2787$g81.1960@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
Ray O'Hara wrote:
"Brian Sharrock" <b.sharrock@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:nZ1wj.68$Z_2.46@newsfe4-win.ntli.net...
According to Wikipedia; - " Irish citizens could serve in the
British armed forces as around 38,554 in the British Army did "
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_neutrality_during_World_War_II

Of course, this figure will be higher if the RN and RAF recruits
were cited.

But i EXPECT "Ray O'Hara" using <mary.palmucci@rcn.com> account
will regale everybody with an explanation of why these Brave Irish
men fought WITH British forces against the Nazis.
men from ulster.
For a start you mean "Northern Ireland", as three counties of Ulster are
in
the Republic.

But in any case, because of Irish sensibilities there was no conscription
in
Northern Ireland - with the net result that more men from South than from
the North served in the British army during World War II.
--
John Briggs




and they are routinely referred to as ulster, so go back to your corner anal
retentive ways.


Not by anyone who knows anything about Ulster and Northern Ireland.

It's a bit like saying California is a Southern state.

--
John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 21:43:02    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: Was: Don't Be Paroch Svar med Sitat

"John Kane" <jrkrideau@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:fpsjcs$soh$3@registered.motzarella.org...
Sitat:
Ray O'Hara wrote:
"John Briggs" <john.briggs4@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:CJ2wj.2787$g81.1960@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
Ray O'Hara wrote:
"Brian Sharrock" <b.sharrock@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:nZ1wj.68$Z_2.46@newsfe4-win.ntli.net...
According to Wikipedia; - " Irish citizens could serve in the
British armed forces as around 38,554 in the British Army did "
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_neutrality_during_World_War_II

Of course, this figure will be higher if the RN and RAF recruits
were cited.

But i EXPECT "Ray O'Hara" using <mary.palmucci@rcn.com> account
will regale everybody with an explanation of why these Brave Irish
men fought WITH British forces against the Nazis.
men from ulster.
For a start you mean "Northern Ireland", as three counties of Ulster
are
in
the Republic.

But in any case, because of Irish sensibilities there was no
conscription
in
Northern Ireland - with the net result that more men from South than
from
the North served in the British army during World War II.
--
John Briggs




and they are routinely referred to as ulster, so go back to your corner
anal
retentive ways.


Not by anyone who knows anything about Ulster and Northern Ireland.
It's a bit like saying California is a Southern state.

--
John Kane, Kingston ON Canada

ulster has 9 counties, 6 are in the british controlled northern ireland.
any one who thinks ulster isn't used as a catch phrase for NI is mistaken
and your anology is typical of a frostback, mistaken.
when my reletives from ireland call someone an ulsterman then mean a prot
from NI
you and the fool blackguard as idiots.
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 23:23:05    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: was Don't Be Parochi Svar med Sitat

On Feb 24, 1:50 pm, "Ray O'Hara" <mary.palmu...@rcn.com> wrote:
Sitat:
deemsb...@aol.com> wrote in message

news:5df52959-a3a2-4110-8599-8fe8f11f20f8@o10g2000hsf.googlegroups.com ...



you're not new to the usenet. you've seen threads morph before. the
starting and end point are rarely the same.

  < That doesn't stop me from trying to rein it in.....

has that ever worked?

No, but I'm on a mission.
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InnleggSkrevet: 24 Feb 2008 23:58:03    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: was Don't Be Parochi Svar med Sitat

Ray O'Hara wrote:


Sitat:
the virginia regiment was more like a continental regt than a militia unit.

That's it. Move the goalposts.
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 00:38:03    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: was Don't Be Parochi Svar med Sitat

"Renia" <renia@DELETEotenet.gr> wrote in message
news:fpssrh$s2s$2@mouse.otenet.gr...
Sitat:
Ray O'Hara wrote:


the virginia regiment was more like a continental regt than a militia
unit.

That's it. Move the goalposts

huh?
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 00:39:02    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: was Don't Be Parochi Svar med Sitat

"John Briggs" <john.briggs4@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:1Ajwj.3794$St5.1048@newsfe1-gui.ntli.net...
Sitat:




http://www.earlyamerica.com/review/2001_winter_spring/colonial_militia .html
it was to take powder stockpiled for use against the brits. every
town had its powder house. the one in my town still stands.
the

militia did not become the colonial army. although many men served.
regiments were raised for the continental army in a similar manner
to the civil war. the colonel was apppinted by the colonial
governor and the men were sworn in as regulars for a specified term
and subject to regular military discipline and rules..

militia units were still used during the war, appearing when trouble
threatened and dispersing to home when it passed.

And exactly the same applied to the Virginia Regiment.

the virginia regiment was more like a continental regt than a militia
unit.

That's what I meant.
--
John Briggs



well then you should have added the comment under the bit about continentals
and not under the militia bit.
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 02:03:03    Tittel: Re: GEORGE WASHINGTON, BRITISH OFFICER: was Don't Be Parochi Svar med Sitat

Ray O'Hara wrote:

Sitat:
"Renia" <renia@DELETEotenet.gr> wrote in message
news:fpssrh$s2s$2@mouse.otenet.gr...

Ray O'Hara wrote:



the virginia regiment was more like a continental regt than a militia

unit.

That's it. Move the goalposts


huh?

You were calling it a militia earlier.
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 07:48:03    Tittel: Re: Is Public Health Losing Credibility? Svar med Sitat

"D. Spencer Hines" <panther@excelsior.com> wrote in message
news:SHswj.762$9l1.5616@eagle.america.net...

Some Scottish culture, courtesy of Spencer Hines.

Lines in Memoriam Regarding the Entertainment I Gave on the 31st March,
1893, in Reform Street Hall, Dundee
'Twas on the 31st of March, and in the year of 1893,
I gave an entertainment in the city of Dundee,
To a select party of gentlemen, big and small,
Who appreciated my recital in Reform Street Hall.

The meeting was convened by J. P. Smith's manager, High Street,
And many of J. P. Smith's employes were there me to greet,
And several other gentlemen within the city,
Who were all delighted with the entertainment they got from me.

Mr Green was the chairman for the night,
And in that capacity he acted right;
He made a splendid address on my behalf,
Without introducing any slang or chaff.

I wish him success during life;
May he always feel happy and free from strife,
For the kindness he has ever shown to me
During our long acquaintance in Dundee.

I return my thanks to Mr J. P. Smith's men,
Who were at my entertainment more than nine or ten;
And the rest of the gentlemen that were there,
Also deserves my thanks, I do declare.

Because they showered upon me their approbation,
And got up for me a handsome donation,
Which was presented to me by Sir Green,
In a purse most beautiful to be seen.

Which was a generous action in deed,
And came to me in time of need.
And the gentlemen that so generously treated me
I'll remember during my stay in Dundee.
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 08:40:13    Tittel: Re: Christian Kings Svar med Sitat

Leo van de Pas wrote:

Sitat:
I understand that the Merovingian king Clovis I the Great converted to Christianity, probably before the year 500.
Forgetting Roman Emperors, was he the first Christian king in history? Where there any earlier ones, for example in Spain?
Leo van de Pas
Canberra, Australia




there were earlier ones. in particular the king of Armenia around 350

and Emperor Ezanas of Ethiopia around 330
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 09:07:24    Tittel: Re: No Country For Old Men Svar med Sitat

"D. Spencer Hines" <panther@excelsior.com> wrote in message news:rtuwj.763

Some Scottish culture, courtesy of Spencer Hines.
Lines in Memoriam Regarding the Entertainment I Gave on the 31st March,
1893, in Reform Street Hall, Dundee
'Twas on the 31st of March, and in the year of 1893,
I gave an entertainment in the city of Dundee,
To a select party of gentlemen, big and small,
Who appreciated my recital in Reform Street Hall.

The meeting was convened by J. P. Smith's manager, High Street,
And many of J. P. Smith's employes were there me to greet,
And several other gentlemen within the city,
Who were all delighted with the entertainment they got from me.

Mr Green was the chairman for the night,
And in that capacity he acted right;
He made a splendid address on my behalf,
Without introducing any slang or chaff.

I wish him success during life;
May he always feel happy and free from strife,
For the kindness he has ever shown to me
During our long acquaintance in Dundee.

I return my thanks to Mr J. P. Smith's men,
Who were at my entertainment more than nine or ten;
And the rest of the gentlemen that were there,
Also deserves my thanks, I do declare.

Because they showered upon me their approbation,
And got up for me a handsome donation,
Which was presented to me by Sir Green,
In a purse most beautiful to be seen.

Which was a generous action in deed,
And came to me in time of need.
And the gentlemen that so generously treated me
I'll remember during my stay in Dundee.
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 09:23:03    Tittel: Re: Guerrillas Svar med Sitat

On Feb 25, 5:18 am, "Nebulous" <jw...@pigtail.com> wrote:

(four cross-posted newsgroups removed)

(snip of rubbish)

Aren't we lucky that - thanks to the campaign of the troll Hines - we
now have yet another cross-posting troll inflicted on SGM?

I hope Douglas Richardson is enjoying the garbage that the rest of us
are having to wade through - afterall, it's exactly what he and his
friend Hines want for this group.

Lucky us.

MA-R
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InnleggSkrevet: 25 Feb 2008 13:38:03    Tittel: Re: Clifford of Mapledurham? Svar med Sitat

Will,

The record of the house of Gournay. By Daniel Gurney. (1845) pp. 222.
During her tenancy of the manor of Mapledurham-Gurnay as her dower,
Matilda de Gurnay obtained the wardship of land of the heir of Roger de
Kingston, who had held in Kingston, com. Berks, one fief of the Honour
of Dudley belonging to Roger de Someri, and she took to her second
husband Roger de Clifford, of Bridge Sollers, com. Heref.

A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 4 (1924), pp. 349-353.
Parishes: Kingston Bagpuize
From William son of Ansculph the overlordship of the second manor of
Kingston descended with the manor of Bradfield, (fn. 55) of which these
lands were held in 1502. (fn. 56)
Adelelm held under William son of Ansculph in 1086. (fn. 57) He is
called Adelelm de Kingston in 1113, (fn. 5Cool and was presumably ancestor
of the succeeding owners of the manor. About 1240 Maud de Gournay,
perhaps wife of Hugh de Gournay who died in 1239, (fn. 59) held a
knight's fee in 'Kyngeston Rogeri' as guardian of the heir of Roger de
Kingston, (fn. 60) and a John de Kingston purchased half a hide of land
here from John Pygate in 1248. (fn. 61) The Kingstons were succeeded by
the family of Fokeram; (fn. 62) William de Fokeram, tenant in 1272, must
have been the William de Fokeram who alienated half the advowson of
Fyfield to the Prior of Poughley. (fn. 63) In 1290 his son William
quitclaimed to William de Birmingham, lord of Maidencourt, and his heirs
the remainder of a messuage, 2 carucates of land and 100s. rent here
which his father and mother Ellen held for life with remainder to
himself. (fn. 64)
Footnotes:
59 Hannay, Norman House, 198.
60 Testa de Nevill (Rec. Com.), 122. The date is fixed by the death of
Robert Achard, lord of Aldermaston (q.v.) and by the grant of Basildon
(q.v.) to Robert de Guisnes.
61 Feet of F. Berks. 32 Hen. III, no. 18.

Extracting:
About 1240 Maud de Gournay, perhaps wife of Hugh de Gournay who died in
1239, (fn. 59) held a knight's fee in 'Kyngeston Rogeri' as guardian of
the heir of Roger de Kingston, (fn. 60)

1242/3 Book of Fees Vol II. BERKS. 1242-1243. p. 844
Roger de Clifford' de terra que fuit Rogeri de Kingeston' in eodem
[Kingeston'] j. feodum
---------------------------------------------------------------------- --

You wont get any other Contemporary Primary scources apart from these!

Abt. 1240 Maud de Gournay held the knight's fee previously held by
Roger de Kingston .

1242/3 Roger de Clifford held the same knight's fee.

Roger married Maud/Matilda the widow of Hugh de Gournay.

Incidentally, Henry Gurney was a dab hand at quoting contemporaneous
primary sources. Check out his 3 books on Google Books.

Tony

Sitat:


------------------------------------------------------
You're quoting a work from 1845, we need to see the original primaries to
see if actually she maybe held a *moiety* of the manor which was later granted.
Also she could have *bought* her sister's half. These sorts of things
can't really be properly worked out through old secondary sources who weren't
terribly apt at quoting their sources exactly.

Will Johnson



**************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
(http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-cam pos-duffy/
2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)

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